Tag Archives: Food

Green Tip: Compost Your Food Waste

Generally food waste is organic and will decompose, but when mixed with other waste in the landfill food waste actually contributes to the production and release of harmful gases which potentially cause environmental damage. In fact, food scraps are the third largest segment of the waste stream with nearly 26 million tons generated each year. Of the overall waste stream,about 12% is food-related, behind paper and plastic

However, by composting your food waste, you can actually put that waste to good use by putting it back back into the earth. The resulting compost can be used in a variety of different ways to support your yard or garden.

Compostable Food Items:

  • Uncooked vegetables and peelings
  • Salad
  • Fruit
  • Tea bags
  • Crushed egg shells
  • Coffee grounds
  • Non-food materials such as plants and flowers, grass clippings, leaves and shredded paper, cardboard.

Non-compostable Food Items:

  • Food which has been cooked. Cooked food, even vegetables, can attract vermin
  • Meat or fish
  • Dairy products
  • Non-food items such as cat or dog litter, large pieces of wood, coal ash
  • Plastics and metals.

How to Compost

You will need to buy or make a compost bin to effectively to manage your waste to create compost. Check with your local municipality for compost bin rebate programs.

Place your compost bin on a level, well-drained area. Make sure that the base of your compost bin is open and place it on soil ideally. This is so that the compost can absorb nutrients and moisture from the soil below easily. It also enables creatures like worms to get into the waste and they help break it down into compost.

Cover the compost bin with a water-proof cover. Every three months you will need to stir the compost pile until it is ready. The process can take anywhere from four to 18 months depending upon your climate and the types of waste in the compost pile. The compost is ready when the compost is a consistent dark brown and develops an earthy smell.

Tips for Composting

  • The ideal composting mixture will be a combination of all the materials in the first list above.
  • Small items tend to compost faster. Cut larger items into smaller pieces to speed the composting process.
  • Add fresh water periodically to maintain the needed moisture level for a healthy compost pile, but do not over-water. If your compost pile gives off a strong odor, add less water and add wood chips or cardboard  to soak up the additional moisture.
  • Access to direct sunlight will speed the composting process.

Easy and Quick Composting

For those that may not want to deal with the physical demands or time it takes for a compost pile to mature, we recommend the use of a tumbling composter. Tumbling is the most effective method for making compost quickly because it evenly mixes nitrogen and carbon materials(green and brown) for optimal eco-interaction. Add the benefit of complete distribution of moisture, air, and organic microbes throughout the batch and you’ll create conditions perfect for express composting. Vented ends provide optimal aeration so this tumbler will help create finished compost 4 to10times quicker than a tradition composting bed. Plus its resistant to animal entry and it’s easy to turn. Just load up the composting drum and tumble it a couple times a week. Nature will do the rest as it creates nutrient rich organic compost in as little as 3 weeks.

If you are interested in a yard composter, you can visit http://www.greenlivingeveryday.com/category-s/40.htm to see our full line of home and garden composting products.

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Filed under Composting, Food Waste, Healthy Living

Food Scrap Diversion Benefits

What is food scrap diversion?

It it widely accepted that food waste and compostable paper comprised 32% of the industrial, commercial, institutional (ICI) waste stream. Food scrap diversion is a process of turning food scraps and other organic waste into nutrient-rich compost.

Many commercial and institutional facilities such as restaurants, grocery stores, and school and hospital cafeterias are now required to have food waste diversion systems in place. Commercial food waste includes raw and cooked food and other compostable organic material from commercial and institutional premises.

Benefits of Food Scrap Diversion Projects:

  • Food scraps are diverted from county landfills, extending the landfill’s life.
  • The environmental impacts of hauling tons of food scraps to county landfill-air pollution, transportation congestion, depletion of fossil fuels-were avoided. The resulting compost was used to improve local soils.
  • As industrial and commercial projects become prevalent, individuals will become more willing to compost their own food scraps at home.
  • Selling the resulting compost will allow for payback for project related costs within a few years.

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Filed under Composting, Food Waste, Recycling

Eat Out Less and Save Money By Eating Green

Here’s a way to save hundreds and even thousands. The best way to save is to take your lunch and make more meals at home. The average U.S. family spends over $5,000 annually. The typical U.S. family spend $4,000 on meals prepared outside of the home. By just brown bagging it 2 times per week an average family will save over $1000 fairly easily.
Cooking at home is also a great first step toward going green. By making your own food, you’ll pay attention to the ingredients you use, how they were grown and how nutritious and healthy they are. You will then consider if your ingredients are organic, whether they are locally sourced.
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Why Just Rinsing Fruits & Vegetables Is Not Enough

Unfortunately, most of the fruits and vegetables in the supermarket are covered in wax, germs, pesticides, soil, herbicides and a whole host of other chemical contaminants. If not washed properly, you may ingest these harmful chemicals.

A quick rinse under sink water is not sufficient to properly clean our fruits and veggies before we eat them, due to the fact that the agricultural industry makes their pesticides, herbicides and most other agricultural chemicals waterproof. The use of wax to make sure fruits and veggies look nice is another way all of these harmful chemicals are sealed onto the food product surface.

The pesticides, fertilizers, herbicides, road dirt, supermarket dirt, molds, fungi, waxes and more, are usually on the beautiful apples, pears, cucumbers and other fruits and vegetables before you eat them. Besides the dirt and other chemicals just mentioned, numerous strangers in the field and in the supermarket have handled your fruit or vegetables before you bought them!

Plain water, alone, just doesn’t get all those chemicals and dirt off before you eat it.

The Natural Solution to Washing Fruits and Vegetables

Many folks in the US and around the world are now finding a solution with vegetable washes and food sanitization systems. Here are a few options:

  1. Vermont Soap Organics Produce Magic - It’s made with organic oils and makes food taste better! Natural soaps have been safely used by humans for thousands of years and harmful detergents for less than a hundred. Doesn’t it make sense that a natural, organic soap safer for you and your family?
  2. Lotus Sanitizing System LSR100 - The lotus® Home Cleaning System infuses water with ozone, in the Multi-Purpose Bowl included with the system, to reduce bacteria and pesticides on foods. You can also use lotus to infuse water in the Multi-Purpose Spray Bottle attachment and sanitize surfaces with one of the lotus® Microfiber Cleaning Cloths, also included with the system.

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