Tag Archives: energy conservation

Nellie’s All Natural Dryerball Benefits

The Nellie’s All Natural Dryerballs possess various outer softening dryer balls 2nodes that work together in the tumble dryer to mechanically soften fabrics without the harmful chemicals found in fabric softeners and dryer sheets. The nodes are used to physically break down the stiffness created by water drying in fabric, thus softening your laundry without the introduction of toxic chemicals. The dryerballs lift and separate the laundry during the drying process, thus resulting in reduced drying time and fabric creasing. The dryerballs softeners also retain the heat and transfer it to the clothes as they tumble, further speeding up the drying process.

There is no need to use chemically laden dryer sheets or fabric softener in your wash. Both dryerballs are placed in the clothes dryer and operate on the normal heatsetting for the fabric being dryed. At the conclusion of the drying cycle, just leave the Nellie’s All Natural Dryerballs in the dryer – they are re-usable – guaranteed to last for 2 years.

Nellie’s All Natural Dryerballs have been provide the following:

• Noticeably softer fabrics

• Reduced drying times by up to 25%

• Reduced laundry lint

• Non-toxic dryer sheet alternative

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Filed under Energy Conservation, Healthy Living, Product Review

Fireplace Efficiency Tips

Inefficient fireplaces can cost you  heat and money this winter. Follow these tips to save money and energy:

  1. Keep fireplace damper closed when not in use. An open damper can result in up to 10% loss in home heating loss.
  2. Be sure to close fireplace doors to lessen heat loss. If you do not have glass doors, install a chimney draft guard to reduce heat loss up the chimney.
  3. Check for air leaks around the fireplace hearth. Leaks should be properly sealed with caulk.
  4. Check the seals around your fireplace flue damper—if the seals aren’t tight, you could be losing home heating through the chimney.
  5. Install tempered glass doors and a heat-air exchange system that blows warm air back into the room.

These tips should keep you warm in your house all winter.fireplace

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Filed under Energy Conservation, Home Winterization

Seal Air Leaks to Conserve Energy

Properly sealing cracks and openings in you home can significantly reduce heating and cooling costs throughout the year. You may already have identified obvious air leaks, but you will need to do a bit more investigation to find the less obvious gaps to properly seal your home. 

Here are several tests that can be used to check for air leaks:

  1. Window Seal Check – Shut the window on a piece of paper. If paper can be pulled without tearing paper, than window should be resealed.caulk_18230501
  2. Visual Gap Check – After daylight hours, shine a light through closed window and door seam and have a partner confirm if light is visible on other side.
  3. Hot/Cold Air Check – Use your hands to feel around door and window seal checking for cold or hot air coming in through a leak.

Common areas to check for leaks are between brick and wood siding, between foundation and walls, and between the chimney and siding. In addition, you should inspect around these areas for leaks and drafts:

  • Door and window frames
  • Mail chutes
  • Electrical and gas service entrances
  • Cable TV and phone lines
  • Outdoor water faucets
  • Where dryer vents pass through walls
  • Bricks, siding, stucco, and foundation
  • Air conditioners
  • Vents and fans

 Home Pressurization Test

If you are having difficulty locating leaks and drafts, you may want to conduct a basic building pressurization test:

  1. First, close all exterior doors, windows and fireplace flues.
  2. Turn off all combustion appliances such as gas burning furnaces and water heaters.
  3. Then turn on all exhaust fans (generally located in the kitchen and bathrooms) or use a large window fan to suck the air out of the rooms.

This test increases infiltration through cracks and leaks, making them easier to detect. You can use incense sticks or your damp hand to locate these leaks. If you use incense sticks, moving air will cause the smoke to drift, and if you use your damp hand, any drafts will feel cool to your hand.

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Filed under Energy Conservation, Home Winterization

Product Review: Smart Faucet

The Smart Faucet is a 1.5gpm aerator with an antimicrobial handle that controls water flow from the faucet. Water only flows whensmart_faucet4 the handle is depressed, although there is a locking disk for continuous flow when needed. Installation may require a wrench but is easy and installation only takes a few minutes. The Smart Faucet requires no batteries or electricity to control water usage.

The Smart Faucet reports savings of up to 15,000 gallons when compared with a standard 2.5gpm aerator and the company offers a one-year limited warranty on parts and components.

Save water while you are soaping up your hands or brushing your teeth with this automatic faucet shut off valve. Great for disabled, elderly, children, arthritic hands or any situation where you don’t want to touch the faucet handles. Set the water handles to desired volume and mix after installing, push back on the lever for water. Let go of the lever and it shuts off the water.

Features:

  • Beautiful chrome finish Faucet Shut Off Valve
  • Installs on most bathroom faucets in minutes
  • No batteries, No electricity, No plumber, No special tools
  • Antimicrobial handle
  • Made in the USA

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Filed under Energy Conservation, Healthy Living, Product Review, Water Conservation

Bright Outlook for Texas Solar

Experts are anticipating that the solar energy market in the state of Texas to achieve significant growth over the next several years.  According to to the Solar Energy Industry Association:

  • Texas ranks 13th in the country in installed solar capacity, with enough solar energy installations to power 12,300 homes.
  • Residential and commercial photovoltaic systems prices fell by 22 percent over the last year.
  • More than 280 solar companies are actively working in the state of Texas, employing more than 3,000 Texans.

 

 

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Filed under Energy Conservation, Solar, Technology

Energy Efficient Roofing

Hot roofs absorb heat, causing air conditioner systems to work harder to cool during the warmer months of the year.

A cool roof uses material that is designed to reflect more sunlight and absorb less heat than a standard roof. Cool roofs can be made of a highly reflective type of paint, a sheet covering, or highly reflective tiles or shingles. Cool Roofs can lower the temperature of your roof by up to 50 degrees, which will reduce cooling costs.

 

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Filed under Energy Conservation, Technology

Spring Clean to Promote Energy Efficiency

  • Clean Refrigerator Coils – Coils can collect dust, making them less efficient for cooling. refrigerator-coilsBe sure to clean coils two times per year to eliminate buildup and reduce energy use by up to 6%.

 

 

 

  • Clean Ventilation – Air conditioning vents and dirty air filters should be cleaned and/or ac ventsreplaced regularly.  Changing filters can reduce HVAC energy use and electricity costs from 5 to 15%.

 

 

 

  • Inspect Vent Hoods – Check vent hoods for need of cleaning or filter replacements. 
    Energy Star certified ventilation fans can use 60% less energy than standard models.

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Filed under Energy Conservation, Uncategorized